Unhealthy Learning

We are always learning but not all learning is good for us. Learning can be as unhealthy as it can be healthy. Learning is as responsible for what goes wrong in our lives as it is for what goes right in our lives. Learning has a dark side.

We can learn our way to the pinnacles of art and science but we can also learn to believe that killing human beings is a holy thing to do. As children we can learn coping strategies that are healthy and adaptive with respect to our immediate emotional needs but that are unhealthy and maladaptive to our learning later in life. Through learning we can extend into new skills, thoughts, emotions, feelings and sensations; and, through learning, we can develop pathological aversions to activities, thoughts, emotions, feelings, and sensations that we’ve learned to fear might hurt usincluding what we've learned to fear might shame us.

Though we can be born with genetic predispositions toward unhealthy behaviors, for the most partCertainly there are people whose learning, behavioral, or health issues have innate neurobiological causes. Our generalization is ‘most’ not ‘all’ – most of our crime problems are consequence of learned behaviors – most of the children who struggle in school are struggling because their learning (noun) is insufficiently resourcing or maladaptively directing their learning (verb)., our actual unhealthy behaviors are learned. For the most partCertainly there are people whose learning, behavioral, or health issues have innate neurobiological causes. Our generalization is ‘most’ not ‘all’ – most of our crime problems are consequence of learned behaviors – most of the children who struggle in school are struggling because their learning (noun) is insufficiently resourcing or maladaptively directing their learning (verb)., we learn our way into addiction, abuse (self and others), and crime. For the most part, we learn our way into unhealthy lifestyles, relationships, and jobs. For the most partCertainly there are people whose learning, behavioral, or health issues have innate neurobiological causes. Our generalization is ‘most’ not ‘all’ – most of our crime problems are consequence of learned behaviors – most of the children who struggle in school are struggling because their learning (noun) is insufficiently resourcing or maladaptively directing their learning (verb)., we learn our way into heart disease and cancer. For the most partCertainly there are people whose learning, behavioral, or health issues have innate neurobiological causes. Our generalization is ‘most’ not ‘all’ – most of our crime problems are consequence of learned behaviors – most of the children who struggle in school are struggling because their learning (noun) is insufficiently resourcing or maladaptively directing their learning (verb)., unhealthy behaviors spread through our learning like diseases spread through our breathing.

Generally speaking, unhealthy behaviors result from unhealthy learning.

Human beings can innocently, intelligently, and unconsciously learn in ways that pathologically retard, diminish, or disable their learning.

Just as we can acquire diseases that turn our immune systems against us, we can aquire mental and emotional habits that turn learning against us. We can learn ‘beliefs’ that avoid learning about anything that threatens them (See: Orientation). We can learn unconsciously automatic cognitive processes and contents that misorient and misdirect our learning (see: Maladaptive Cognitive Schema). We can learn to subconsciously-automatically avoid the feeling of confusionIf we've learned to blame ourselves for feeling confused we will feel shame when we feel confused. If we feel too much shame when we feel confused our natural intelligence will try to protect us from the shame by avoiding the confusion. All learning involves some degree of confusion. A subconsciously-automatic avoidance of confusion profoundly and unhealthily limits our learning - it's learning disabling. in ways that disables our learning (see: MIND-SHAME).

Just as the word learning can be used as a noun (what was learned) and a verb (the active process of learning), ‘unhealthy learning’ can also be applied both ways. Not only can what  we learn be healthy or unhealthy in terms of behavioral-health outcomes, how we learn can be healthy or unhealthy in terms of what we’re learning in particular as well as how well we learn in general.

Healthy learning (noun) provides the ‘scaffolding’ that enables our learning (verb) to extend into new dimensions and abilities. Healthy learning (noun) integrates deeply, ‘transfers’ well, and resources, supports, and orients healthy learning (verb). Healthy learning is adaptive to the present situation without being maladaptive to learning in future situations.

Unhealthy Learning disables or maladaptively misdirects or undermines our learning. Unhealthy learning (noun) misdirects and misorients our learning (verb). Unhealthy learning can be either cognitive or emotional content or cognitive or emotional habits of participating in learning that undermine or maladaptively skew learning.

Most struggling children are struggling because what they learned in the past is inadequately resourcing or maladaptively directing their current learning. To help children through their learning struggles (at school and in life) we have to be able to recognize and address unhealthy learning.

The most important step toward improving the health of our children’s learning is recognizing, understanding, and minimizing, unhealthy learning.

If we change how we think about learning we change everything.

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