Tag Archives | shame

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Adult Literacy: Overcoming Self-Sabotaging Habits

According to NAAL data, reading proficiency remains a significant bottleneck to social and economic progress for tens of millions of U.S. adults. Adults struggling with literacy (in their native language) are not only struggling with the inherent difficulties involved in literacy learning, they are struggling with what they learned in the past that is sabotaging […]

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Mind-Shame

Unhealthy Learning: Chronic Learning Performance Anxiety

What happens to the learning of children who grow up chronically feeling not good enough at learning?Chronic learning performance anxiety negatively affects the learning-health of most of our children.

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How Shyness Affects Learning Spoken and Written Language

When a child is shame-averse to expressing what they are reading, they are, necessarily, less able to learn to read.

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do you see what I see

Do you see what I see? The Child, the Child…

What we call their improficiencies are ours. Proficiency stats are mirrors that say more about our proficiency in stewarding their learning than they say about their capacity for learning.

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TED Talk: Shame Disabled Learning in Culture of Medicine

I experienced… the unhealthy shame that exists in our culture of medicine — where I felt alone, isolated, not feeling the healthy kind of shame that you feel, because you can’t talk about it with your colleagues.

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N.Y. Times: Doctors Suffer From Shame Disabled Learning Too

Until we attend to the culture of shame that surrounds learning errors, we will be only nipping at the edges of one of the greatest threats to our children’s education.

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MUTISM & MIND-SHAME

Refusing to speak or speaking in a whisper spares the child from the possible humiliation or embarrassment of saying the “wrong” thing.

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Update: Children of the Code: CHANGING TRAJECTORIES – the Final Chapter

“CHANGING TRAJECTORIES” is the final chapter of Phase I of COTC and includes our suggestions and tips for improving the learning trajectories of struggling readers.

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Update: Children of the Code Release: “The Brain’s Challenge”

“THE BRAIN’S CHALLENGE” is the centerpiece of the Children of the Code project and illustrates the main challenge underlying learning to read difficulties in the English language.

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When Learning Hurts – Toxic Learning

What and how students learn can have toxic effects on how well they learn thereafter. It’s vitally important that educators understand this.

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